Fenway Park, Home of Boston Red Sox World Series Winners 2013

My season of being a Red Sox fan began in April, only a week or so after the Boston Bombing by terrorists. I was a bit apprehensive about going to the game but we were determined to not let horrible, emotionless, vile people change how we want to live our lives. We did nothing to deserve this act of war.

Fenway Park, Boston, Massachusetts

Torn from the pages of my sketchbook to celebrate the World Series win by the Boston Red Sox in 2013!

The fans seemed happy to be at the ballpark but the air was heavy with concern for what the future would bring after this horrendous event of terror on innocent people–and especially children– simply enjoying a beautiful spring day watching and cheering their friends and family at the end of the Boston Marathon route. Boston Strong images were everywhere at the Sox game and now seemed to be a precursor for what the season could bring.

The color scheme of this 12×6 piece torn from my sketchbook may seem melancholy–although I did not have this in mind when I drew it. I was exploring the design possibilities of the abstract lines and shapes distinctly found in Fenway. I have done others that have evening lighting and more intense color but I happen to like this reserved version. It is available at the Copley Society of Art on Newbury Street in Boston, MA. www.copleysociety.org

State of Maine Blues

Surrounded by Blues

Surrounded by Blues

Coastal Maine with its crisp whites, deep blues and accents of reds and oranges continue to find their way into my artwork. One day it occurred to me that if Maine redesigned its state flag it could look something like this. Of course inlanders would not be happy so I’ve kept this idea to myself. One visitor to one of my outdoor show in South Portland, Maine this summer laughed out loud when he saw the title and “got” the image. A fun moment. Not a sale but just as rewarding when someone understands that my work is not representational but seeks to propose a different, uncommon way of viewing common views. I abstract elements of a landscape and reorder, repurpose and reimagine all while filtering this input through my head and heart. Whew. Amazing how humans work.

Coexisting–Plein Air and Studio Air

Autumn Reflected May 2013

 

We artists have so many options open to us as we design a new piece of art. This one is less real and more abstract or is it more abstract than real. Let me explain. I love working with the landscape–New England, Caribbean and beyond– and that does not always mean working directly in front of it–plein air–as it is commonly known. I enjoy the process of interpreting the things that have inspired me and reworking into artworks that speak the language of the landscape but also let my personal interpretations in as well. Let me know your thoughts on this new piece entered in the Modernist Exhibition at the Copley Society of Art in Boston. Let see if it makes the cut. It was inspired by Amadeo de Souza Cardoso, Portuguese, 1877-1918, “The Leap of the Rabbit.” Pieces entered are required to be inspired by a work or artist own at famous The Armory Show in NYC in 1913.

For purchase and/or more information please visit www.anntrainordomingue.com or www.facebook.com/anntrainordomingueart for regular updates. Thanks in advance for sharing my work.

Memorial Bridge in the Abstract

Image

Last week I was visiting the NH Art Association Levy Gallery on State Street in Portsmouth and walked down to the waterfront to check out the progress on the deconstruction of the Memorial Bridge built in 1923. I was treated to a gorgeous view with late afternoon light perfectly illuminating a variety of metal surfaces. The round flower-like shapes of the fly-wheels–I’m guessing at what these are actual called–were not something I have seen before. Certainly not Continue reading

Framed In Four Seasons

View out the coop

To most this is a window. To an artist it frames the landscape in ways that you might not have considered. A single pane window offers a broad view taking in the entire landscape. Segmenting it into 4 sections creates a simple way to check the viability of a single composition–a handy ready-made composition tool. Combine two side by side or vertically and you have a simple way to find a strong design option. Try it–you’ll like what it can do for refreshing your tried and true compositions.