Maine’s Rothko Inspiration

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Transparent. Reflective. Abstract. Real. All at once.

That’s how I view quick snapshots taken while walking along York Beach, Maine last summer when the water was at least 55 degrees warmer than today. I was playing with my compact camera simply letting it do its thing–opening and closing the shutter and allowing light to come in. It’s these impulsive, unscripted images that allow for some interpretation as well as connections to other seemingly unrelated things. A Mark Rothko painting (famous for his color field approach) for instance, seems to have been inspired by a seascape such as the one I’ve posted here. This kind of simplification can be a show stopper when the rest of the online world is showing/displaying an incredible number of images every second of every day. I’m tired just thinking about it. Thought for today is simple, simplify.

rothko lo res Blue Divided by Blue, 1966, Mark Rothko, 1903-1970.

Open Studio 2013, Ann Trainor Domingue– messy, uncommon, friendly, contemporary painter

Open Studio 2013 Ann Trainor Domingue

Saturday and Sunday, November 2 & 3, 10am-4pm. Details on flier.

Blending In to Stand Out

Here’s a wonderful example of an analogous color scheme and a great example of camouflage in nature. Analogous colors are those that are found right next to each other on a color wheel, or are very similar in color and tonality such as the leaves and Thomas’ fur. The warm tones of the oak and maple leaves match his burnt sienna-colored fur very well. His darker fur and nose direct your eye toward these areas because they are different tones and color than the rest of the photo–and his face is the real area of interest–as most portraits are. The soft greens at the left side help to bring some variation in the overall color palette yet does not detract from the main area of focus.

There are plenty of examples in nature–and hunters experience this natural camouflage on every outing making it pretty tough to get their prey in the rich textures and colors of the woods. (As an animal lover, I’d rather hunt with a camera.) But I appreciate the challenge of hunting and the skills it takes to be successful. Fishing has the same camouflage effect–every try to find a fish in a stream? The sunlight and shadows as well as ripples all contribute to the complexities of light and form–making it a close to perfect camouflage.

And Thomas, he’s an excellent dog, well-behaved and a very patient model.

 

Sweetening the Deal

Nothing like a great pastry shop

Is there anything that comes close to being more appetizing?

Ok. I admit it. Sparkling, colorful sweets call out to me at any pastry shop. And this one in Boston near the statehouse was screaming–you must at least take a photo if you’re not going to take me home to gobble me up. I find these simply irresistible Continue reading

Coming Up for Air

Poolside

Encased in pool blue

Up for Air

This perfect summer day included a patient grandchild who willingly sank below the surface to help make a cool photo.  I loved the way the water glistened over her skin while her dark hair delineated beautiful facial features. Timing was everything–many clicks later–as water holds still for no one. The pool provided the expected blues while Emily’s skin provided a subtle warm golden tan, a complimentary color for the blue. The dark accents of her facial Continue reading

Winter Whites Will Wait

Tree trunk abstract shape

Winter walk in the shadows

You might think this tree trunk is blocking the view of this antique colonial home in the village of Goffstown, NH. But the way I see it, it has created bold abstract forms contrasting against the bright whites of the white clapboards. And this stark color change from white to dark gray called out to me to take a closer look. Continue reading