Maine’s Rothko Inspiration

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Transparent. Reflective. Abstract. Real. All at once.

That’s how I view quick snapshots taken while walking along York Beach, Maine last summer when the water was at least 55 degrees warmer than today. I was playing with my compact camera simply letting it do its thing–opening and closing the shutter and allowing light to come in. It’s these impulsive, unscripted images that allow for some interpretation as well as connections to other seemingly unrelated things. A Mark Rothko painting (famous for his color field approach) for instance, seems to have been inspired by a seascape such as the one I’ve posted here. This kind of simplification can be a show stopper when the rest of the online world is showing/displaying an incredible number of images every second of every day. I’m tired just thinking about it. Thought for today is simple, simplify.

rothko lo res Blue Divided by Blue, 1966, Mark Rothko, 1903-1970.

Hazy, Hot, Humid Art

How one hazy summer day inspired several artworks

How one hazy summer day inspired several artworks

Who would have thought a stroll after a nice dinner at the Lobster Pot would have captivated my artistic eye for so long. A quick snapshot taken one hot afternoon in Provincetown, MA has been the catalyst of many of my artworks. As with many other photos I have taken, as soon as one painting is completed I have another idea to improve/change/renovate the next one. So this one, on the advice of Mary Harding curator of the George Marshall Store Gallery in York, Maine, to “paint bigger” here is one of the results. Raking Light Across at 36×36 gave me the space and opportunity to really dig in and work on the layering of color and texture. It was a blast. More to come.

 

Painting About More Than Reflections

Reflections at Work story

How a blurry photo of a clear day inspires

It seems to be endlessly interesting for art viewers to learn the story behind a painting. And to tell you the truth I like to dig in and find out this information too when I am on the gallery hopping route. I like to make the link from inspiration to interpretation and put myself in an artist’s shoes/sandals/barefeet and see what they saw, feel what they felt, and hear the little thing that became so powerful it had to become an artwork. It’s these translations that are as varied as there are artists in the world. So enjoy the view and let me know your thoughts on my visual story above. Find me and click the “Like” button to follow me on Facebook at www.Facebook/anntrainordomingueart or www.anntrainordomingue.com

Lesson from the Keeper’s House, Monhegan Island–Ann Trainor Domingue

6 a.m. light on the house

6 a.m. light on the house

One photo or one sketch is not the inspiration for only one work of art. Depending on what kind of information is retained, noted, or memorized will determine how an artist uses that reference for final art. Even then the artist might completely disregard those notes because over time, similar to simmering a delicious Italian red sauce, other ideas and influencers take their place in your mind, eye and heart and drive you in a new direction. Though the sketch above was done in 2010, my new painting in 2013 looks nothing likes other earlier attempts of years past, but I believe it is a better result. Please Like my Facebook page at www.facebook.com/anntrainordomingueart and signup to receive my newsletter at www.anntrainordomingue.com

How just a snapshot inspires a boatload of paintings

MacMillan Wharf fishing boat

MacMillan Wharf, Cape Cod fishing boat slowly cruising home

From snapshot, to sketch, to final painting–here’s a sample of how I create my paintings. Not all happen this way but this is a process I find captures an inspiration, allows me to mull over the possibilites and then sketch options and try out with various media. Exploring without knowing my end goal is my idea of great fun while creating each artwork. Visit my website to see more www.anntrainordomingue.com or email me at domingue@comcast.net to receive my newsletter.

Blending In to Stand Out

Here’s a wonderful example of an analogous color scheme and a great example of camouflage in nature. Analogous colors are those that are found right next to each other on a color wheel, or are very similar in color and tonality such as the leaves and Thomas’ fur. The warm tones of the oak and maple leaves match his burnt sienna-colored fur very well. His darker fur and nose direct your eye toward these areas because they are different tones and color than the rest of the photo–and his face is the real area of interest–as most portraits are. The soft greens at the left side help to bring some variation in the overall color palette yet does not detract from the main area of focus.

There are plenty of examples in nature–and hunters experience this natural camouflage on every outing making it pretty tough to get their prey in the rich textures and colors of the woods. (As an animal lover, I’d rather hunt with a camera.) But I appreciate the challenge of hunting and the skills it takes to be successful. Fishing has the same camouflage effect–every try to find a fish in a stream? The sunlight and shadows as well as ripples all contribute to the complexities of light and form–making it a close to perfect camouflage.

And Thomas, he’s an excellent dog, well-behaved and a very patient model.